Employee Spotlight – Matt Johnson

Employee Spotlight - Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson, SJF EngineerAfter 14+ years, we finally decided to feature Matt Johnson, our resident SJF Engineer, in the SJF Spotlight. Matt is our Lead Engineer at SJF. He is involved in various stages of the sales cycle and is often called in to assist customers during and after product implementation. He also works with all departments and can definitely be called the “Go to Guy” for SJF.

Family is a priority for him. He has a wife, Alisa and two kids, Callen and Ella. In the summer, he does camping and family trips. In the winter you can find him back in his hockey skates while coaching his son. He’s also a football fan, although his loyalties don’t lie with the Minnesota Vikings but with the (gulp) Green Bay Packers. We’re working on forgiving him for that, however therapy may be required… 😉


Name: Matt Johnson

Title: Engineer

When did you start working at SJF? 2004

What do you like most about working at SJF? Every day is different. There are always new challenges.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not at work? Spending time with family camping, fishing and skating or playing hockey.

What’s your favorite day? Friday. I look forward to the weekend.

Biggest pet peeve? When people don’t listen well enough to retain information. Or people who complain about something but are not part of the solution.

Name something about you that people would be surprised to know: I had hair down the middle of my back in Jr. High School.

What question would you like to answer that you didn’t get asked: Do you like being in the Spotlight? No. I don’t.

2018 “Fit as a Fiddle Contest” Ends – Winner: Ed Salonek

Ed Salonek takes home the grand prize of a Yoga Lenovo laptop

Final tally is in on the SJF Phase III “Fit as a Fiddle” Contest…

Please join us in congratulating Ed Salonek in our Accounting Department for losing the most weight, with an astounding 4.622% body weight lost! A close second place went to Tom Moore in the Sales Department, with 4.491% body weight loss, and third place went to Denise Rosenau in the Web & Marketing Department, with a 1.202% body weight loss.

Ed walks away with not only better health, but also the grand prize – an Yoga Lenovo laptop, sponsored by MedVelocity.

In total, 29.6 lbs. was shed by the group, with 11 employees participating.

A special thanks goes out to MedVelocity for sponsoring this contest and providing not only the prizes, but also positive motivation throughout the contest duration.

Who you buy it from is often more important than who made it

Pallet rack, like the majority of material handling equipment, is available from several quality manufacturers in the United States. The question of what to buy is normally fairly straightforward. The real question is, who you buy it from to get the best possible deal in terms of price, delivery and support. There are several options.

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Auction Buying Secrets – 7 Rookie Mistakes You Should Never Ever Make

So it’s your first auction and the place is full of people and excitement. The auctioneer is barking out bids, numbers and prices. People all around you are bidding on an item like it’s a long-lost childhood toy. You notice that some item you have just seen in the store sold for a fraction of the store price. A second item comes up and it goes for yet another great bargain. You think, “Wow, this seems like a pretty easy way to get things dirt cheap. Maybe I should bid and get in on the action. How hard can it be anyway…right?”

Wrong!

While great buys can be had at auctions, the opposite is also true. Getting stuck with something that isn’t what you thought it was can (and more often than not, does) happen. Below are some pro tips that you can use to avoid costly mistakes. Following the tips will save you a lot of grief and expense and give you the tools you need to bid like the pros.

#1 – Hidden costs

While auctions provide a means for anyone to find a bargain, it’s important to keep in mind many of the hidden costs often associated with auction buying.

Buyer’s Premium/Commissions

Most, if not all auctions have what is called a buyer’s premium. This is an additional fee that is put on all items sold at an auction. This fee can run anywhere from 10% to 20% of the item’s sell price. This cost is an additional fee that you will be charged for items you buy in addition to the price you bid. Beware – buyer’s premiums can add up very quickly. Auctions can often have different buyer’s premiums for those bidding online and those physically bidding at the auction. Every auction is different so take note of what these costs are and which fees apply to you before you bid.

#2 – Do a detailed inventory and inspection

If I can give you two pieces of advice here – it would be these:

  • Don’t assume all the parts or there.
  • Don’t assume missing parts can be requisitioned or repurchased.

I’ve seen to many rookie bidders thinking they got a great buy only to discover later that the items are no longer in production or the manufacturer is out of business. Do a detailed inspection of items to make sure all necessary items (ie. hardware, parts, controls, manuals etc.) are there. If parts are missing make sure replacements are available and have an idea of what the costs will be to fix, repair or replace what is missing before you bid.

#3 – Taxes & Fees

Depending on the location of the auction, be aware that different states have different rules about what taxes or fees they want you to pay. Some states are nothing some are 6% – 8% or more.

#4 – Remember…there are no “Do-Overs”

What that means is that “What you see is what you get!” and “You buy it, you own it!”

If an item you bid on doesn’t run or isn’t what you thought it was, you have NO RECOURSE later. The auctioneer is not going to give you your money back or allow you to back out of a purchase once you buy it. It is your responsibility to know what it is you are bidding on – NOT the auctioneers. Items purchased thru auctions are inherently sold “as-is, where-is” with no implied guarantee or warrantee.

Caution: Auction bidding is a fast paced game for grown-ups – not victims. At auction, you sign the auction’s terms and agreement paperwork before you are allowed to bid. This agreement is a legally binding contract that says you know what you are doing and what you are bidding on, and you assume all liability to pay for whatever you buy in the condition it is in when you buy it. If you bid on an item thinking it works or runs only to find out later it doesn’t – too bad. In other words – you buy it, you own it.

#5 – Removal Costs

Never forget, unless specifically stated otherwise, everything in an auction is sold “as-is, where-is.” If the equipment you purchased requires dismantling and/or removal, YOU (as its new owner) will be responsible for the disassembly and removal of the item – not the auctioneer or former owner. This can be very expensive.

#6 – Time Costs

Related to removal costs are time costs. There are often very short time frames and/or restraints for removal that you will be responsible to adhere to. Failure to comply with these can result in fines or legal action and even forfeiture of the equipment. The time you have to remove the item can also drastically affect the final sale price you and others may be willing to pay. I have seen time frames for removal that range from the same day as the auction to several weeks or even months. Know when things need to be removed before you bid.

#7 – Transportation

Items to big to move by yourself may require additional people or equipment to move. The auctioneer IS NOT going to do that for you. Don’t bid on items that will require you to hire or requisition additional people unless you know the costs of doing so in advance. With fuel prices on the rise, having to freight items across long distances can be very costly. Again, know and factor in all the costs before you bid.

There you have it – as with any great deal – the devil really is in the details. Please feel free to comment or share other auction tips or tricks in the comments below.